Why Own a Cat?

There’s a danger you know.
You can’t own just one, for the craving will grow.
There’s no doubt they’re addictive, wherein lies the danger
While living with lots, you’ll grow poorer and stranger
One cat is not trouble, and two are so funny,
The third one is easy, the fourth one’s a honey
The fifth is delightful, the sixth ones’s a breeze.
You find you can live with a houseful, with ease.
So how ’bout another? Would you really dare?
They’re really quite easy, but Oh Lord, the hair!
With cats on the sofa and cats on the bed,
And crates in the kitchen, its no bother, you said.
They’re really no trouble, their manners are great.
What’s just one more cat and one more little crate?
The sofa is hairy, the windows are crusty.
The floor is all footprints, the furniture’s dusty.
The housekeeping suffers, but what do you care?
Who minds a few noseprints and a little more hair?
So let’s keep a kitten, you can always find room.
And a little more time for the dust cloth and broom.
There’s hardly a limit to the cats you can add
the thought of a cutback, sure makes you feel sad.
Each one is special, so useful, so funny,
The food bill grows larger, you owe the vet money.
Your folks never visit, few friends come to stay,
Except other cat folks, who live the same way.
Your lawn has now died and your shrubs are dead, too.
Your weekends are busy, you’re off with your crew.
There’s cat food and vitamins, grooming and shots
And entries and travel and motels, which cost lots.
Is it worth it you wonder? Are you caught in a trap?
Then that favorite comes up and climbs in your lap.
His look says you’re special and you know that you will
Keep all of the kittens in spite of the bill.
Some just for showing and some just to breed
And some just for loving, they all fill a need.
Late evening is awful, you scream and you shout
At the cats on the sofa, who refuse to get up.
The cats and the cat shows, the travel, the thrills
The work and the worry, the pressure, the bills.
The Whole thing seems worth it, the cats are your life.
They’re charming and funny and offset the strife.
Your lifestyle has changed, things just won’t be the same.
Yes, those cats are addictive and so’s the cat game!

Author Unknown

Be a good person, but don’t waste time trying to prove it

One only can hope to live good as one can
To be a good woman or be a good man
To learn how to receive you must know how to give
And live by the moral of live and let live
Most people in their ways can be good and kind
But if you only look for flaws in others then flaws you will find
You never will become the toast of the town
If in your words you do like to put others down
You can only be the best that you can be
And if you look for good in others then good you will see
And if you cannot say good things of others nothing of them say
You are doing well in life if you can live in this way
On learning to walk the child often does fall
And to be a good person not easy at all.

by Francis Duggan

Save Animals Save Ourselves

Gorilla Imagination

the ultimate used his creativity,
and planned for a huge diversity,
tiger, lion, parrot, carrot everyone else,
from every nationality,
we are sanctity,
if you have humanity,
you don’t hope yourselves as vanity.
we are one among in you,
but you made us few.
you will flourish,
if you save us.
you will perish,
if you pave us.
we roar to all his creativity,
to have a little humanity.
to save, not pave.
we buzz to help us,
rather you fuss.
we all fall in pathos,
save us and have kudos.
enshrine, not destroy,
all world can heal,
let us plant tree and leave them free.
almighty created all of us,
let them also take a chance to live
killing animals should not be a fun
so let all put our hands together to shun

by masarapu navyasree

Bandit of My Heart

Oh, Bandit, what’s your impish task
While sporting, sly, that little mask?

You seem quite innocent and frail
Yet the kitchen tells a different tale

Floor all messy, the counters, too
Paw prints that led straight to you

But while I had a penance planned
You’re far too sweet to reprimand

Looking slumberous in your slouch
Reclining leisurely upon the couch

Soon you’ll close those kitty eyes
And off you’ll scamper to fantasize

Such fuzzy mitts you’ll fuzzily flail
While prizing creatures, (and your tail)

I can’t help query what you’ll scheme
While making mischief in your dream

Though doubts, have I, it can’t outdo
The pranks you pull while being You

But antics granted, here you’ll stay
Because I’d have you no other way

So while you’re “Plunder-On-All-Fours”
You’ve plundered, too, this heart..

That’s yours

by Gregory R Barden

Into the forest I go, to lose myself and find my soul

Into the forest I go, to lose myself and find my soul

Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening
By Robert Frost

Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village though;
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.

My little horse must think it queer
To stop without a farmhouse near
Between the woods and frozen lake
The darkest evening of the year.

He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake.
The only other sound’s the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep,
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep.

Kindness to Animals

Giraffe Child

Little children, never give
Pain to things that feel and live;

Let the gentle robin come
For the crumbs you save at home;
As his meat you throw along
He’ll repay you with a song.

Never hurt the timid hare
Peeping from her green grass lair,
Let her come and sport and play
On the lawn at close of day.

The little lark goes soaring high
To the bright windows of the sky,
Singing as if t’were always spring,
And fluttering on an untired wing –
Oh! Let him sing his happy song,
Nor do these gentle creatures wrong.

~ Author unknown

KINDNESS TO ANIMALS

1 Be kind to animals, my child:
2 Don’t make the gentle ringworm wild.
3 Little children shouldn’t tease
4 Little Fido’s littler fleas.
5 When you see th’industrious ant
6 Too heavy burdened toil and pant,
7 Ease him of his irksome load,
8 Lift it for him down the road.
9 Don’t bite the little worm in half
10 That in your lettuce hides-just laugh,
11 Politely stroke his slimy head,
12 And eat some other things instead.
13 Speak not harshly to the moth
14 Though she dines on fur and cloth,
15 Remember everyone must eat,
16 –Why not offer her a treat?-
17 Cut a large sized bit of fur
18 From your coat and give it her,
19 Such unselfishness as this
20 Will fill your Mother’s heart with bliss.
21 And lastly, pray do not encroach
22 With heavy tread upon the roach,
23 The insect’s jellified remains
24 Afflict the rugs with horrid stains.
25 Be gentle to these fellow creatures,
26 And ever learn to love your teachers.

A. J. M. Smith, The Complete Poems, ed. Brian Trehearne (London, Ontario: Canadian Poetry Press, 2007): 188-89.

Romeo and Juliet

But soft! What light through yonder window breaks?
It is the east, and Juliet is the sun.
Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon,
Who is already sick and pale with grief,
That thou, her maid, art far more fair than she.
Be not her maid since she is envious.
Her vestal livery is but sick and green,
And none but fools do wear it. Cast it off!
It is my lady. Oh, it is my love.
Oh, that she knew she were!
She speaks, yet she says nothing. What of that?
Her eye discourses. I will answer it.—
I am too bold. ‘Tis not to me she speaks.
Two of the fairest stars in all the heaven,
Having some business, do entreat her eyes
To twinkle in their spheres till they return.
What if her eyes were there, they in her head?
The brightness of her cheek would shame those stars
As daylight doth a lamp. Her eye in heaven
Would through the airy region stream so bright
That birds would sing and think it were not night.
See how she leans her cheek upon her hand.
Oh, that I were a glove upon that hand
That I might touch that cheek!

Act 2, Scene 2. Romeo and Juliet is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare early in his career about two young star-crossed lovers whose deaths ultimately reconcile their feuding families. It was among Shakespeare’s most popular plays during his lifetime and along with Hamlet, is one of his most frequently performed plays.

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The Smile BY WILLIAM BLAKE

Smile Poem

There is a Smile of Love
And there is a Smile of Deceit
And there is a Smile of Smiles
In which these two Smiles meet

And there is a Frown of Hate
And there is a Frown of disdain
And there is a Frown of Frowns
Which you strive to forget in vain

For it sticks in the Hearts deep Core
And it sticks in the deep Back bone
And no Smile that ever was smild
But only one Smile alone

That betwixt the Cradle & Grave
It only once Smild can be
But when it once is Smild
Theres an end to all Misery

Smile, Smile, Smile
BY WILFRED OWEN
Head to limp head, the sunk-eyed wounded scanned
Yesterday’s Mail; the casualties (typed small)
And (large) Vast Booty from our Latest Haul.
Also, they read of Cheap Homes, not yet planned;
“For,” said the paper, “when this war is done
The men’s first instinct will be making homes.
Meanwhile their foremost need is aerodromes,
It being certain war has just begun.
Peace would do wrong to our undying dead,—
The sons we offered might regret they died
If we got nothing lasting in their stead.
We must be solidly indemnified.
Though all be worthy Victory which all bought.
We rulers sitting in this ancient spot
Would wrong our very selves if we forgot
The greatest glory will be theirs who fought,
Who kept this nation in integrity.”
Nation?—The half-limbed readers did not chafe
But smiled at one another curiously
Like secret men who know their secret safe.
(This is the thing they know and never speak,
That England one by one had fled to France
Not many elsewhere now save under France).
Pictures of these broad smiles appear each week,
And people in whose voice real feeling rings
Say: How they smile! They’re happy now, poor things.

“How Do I Love Thee?”- Elizabeth Browning

“How Do I Love Thee?”- Elizabeth Browning

“How Do I Love Thee?”- Elizabeth Browning

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of being and ideal grace.
I love thee to the level of every day’s
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
I love thee freely, as men strive for right.
I love thee purely, as they turn from praise.
I love thee with the passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood’s faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints. I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life; and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death.

“ Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” -Robert Frost

Whose woods these are I think I know.

His house is in the village though;

He will not see me stopping here

To watch his woods fill up with snow.

My little horse must think it queer

To stop without a farmhouse near

Between the woods and frozen lake

The darkest evening of the year.

He gives his harness bells a shake

To ask if there is some mistake.

The only other sound’s the sweep

Of easy wind and downy flake.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep,

But I have promises to keep,

And miles to go before I sleep,

And miles to go before I sleep.